Thursday, July 17, 2014

New Energy Efficient Shop Lights

About two months back, a representative of Silicon Valley Energy Watch approached us with energy saving opportunities that included the shop lights.  We previously had the large 250W metal halide fixtures as shown.  They took approximately 3 minutes to come up to full strength, but the lighting was good... Or so I thought.


Silicon Valley Energy Watch assured me that the high bay 175w T8 shop lights replacement fixtures were going to be as good or better than the traditional metal halide lights.  They didn't look like much before they were juiced, but I was surprised by just how bright they are.  They also come up instantly which is a nice benefit.



The real benefit though is the energy savings which equals cost savings.  It is estimated based on our usage that these lights will save us $500 per year.  Not bad for lights that are only on for 4 hours per day.  

Friday, June 27, 2014

Micromanaging water

One of the problems that is not realized during this extended dry period is the fact that the winter rains haven't come and flushed out all of the salts that accumulated in the soil after a season of irrigation. This flushing allows our bare turf areas that turned because of salt stress to recover.  To give a numerical number to describe the problem, our fairway soils this time last year had an average sodium percentage of 2.25ppm.  This year the average sodium percentage is 8ppm.  With this much sodium in the soil, despite the soil profile being saturated, the plant will take up the sodium causing something called wet wilt.  

To begin to address the problem, I need to knock down the sodium. I have taken the steps of applying both gypsum and potassium sulfate to the fairways.  The gypsum will help remove some of the sodium in the soil and because  potassium is easier for the plant to uptake than the sodium, we should see (we have seen) a positive improvement.  

With the sodium problem being addressed, we are now beginning to aerate and fill in voids of turf that were salt stressed last year.  This is a difficult task in the sense that it is hard to keep such small areas of turf moist throughout the day and using the sprinklers is an incredibly inefficient use of our water.   

To solve this problem, I turned to a page from my first year in turf back home in Michigan and that was to fill up the sprayer and go water the small spots.  While it eats up labor hours, 100% of the water is going where we need it and it is actually  faster than pulling a hose down the fairway like you see us do for dry spots.

Thursday, April 24, 2014

New Range Tee System

After the range project was completed and prior to opening, I thought that we needed to develop a system for moving the ropes on the range.  Our range is tricky in that it needs to be set at proper angles to avoid, or at least try to avoid, hitting balls towards 9 Mountain.  It is also very small considering we accommodate over 70k rounds per year and the tee is only 21,000 square feet.  Previously, we would rotate through the tee in only 4 weeks leaving a lot of gaps between divots.  Luckily we do have  mats in the back and we utilized them Monday through Wednesday.  

 What we have now is a series of dots on the tee marked off every three feet on the left, middle, and right side.  They were all measured off the back line with the proper angle set.  Starting in the back, we would put the first day on the range on marks 1 & 3 leaving a 6ft teeing area.  The next day, we put the ropes on marks 2 & 4 effectively splitting the previous days worth of divots with the back rope.  

With this system in place, we made it 7 weeks and a day before we utilized the entire tee!  What this means for us now is that we will be on the grass tee from Wednesday through Sunday until winter comes.  

Monday, April 7, 2014

Everyone Doing Their Part


The other day as I was walking through the kitchen at Cinnabar Hills Golf Club, I had noticed a new bucket next to the dish washing area and a huge smile came across my face after I read the message.  The bucket had a message on it for the staff to empty drinking water into it that hadn't been drunk.  This is the optimism I mentioned in a previous post about what I thought a drought period can provide.  Everyone doing their part and hopefully becoming a way of life and not just something we do for today.  That water (almost 2g/ day) is now used on the flowers near the front door.

Please see our "Commitment To Community" page on the website to see what we are doing at Cinnabar Hills Golf Club during the drought and for more water saving tips, visit the "Save 20 Gallons" page brought to us by the Santa Clara Valley Water District.

Friday, March 21, 2014

Ant Hills

The past few weeks we have begun to raise fairway and rough sprinklers that were more than a half an inch below the surface.  One golfer who passed by referred to all of the mounds of dirt on the first hole of the Canyon as ant  hills and I got a nice chuckle out of it.

In just one day, 6 of our staff members raised 30 heads.  Unfortunately that was on the first hole only.  What the guys have to do is first dig up the sprinkler down to the swing joint which is typically 2 ft deep.  Once the sprinkler is dug up, we remove the soil and backfill with sand while holding the sprinkler level.  In this case, we are using the old sand from the driving range tee project.  We do this because the sand is much easier to dig up if we ever have a problem with that sprinkler down the road.

All of this effort is to ensure that the water we apply is going where it needs to go.  When the heads are low, the bottom spray hits the soil around the sprinkler creating a wet spot at the sprinkler and a dry spot where that water was supposed to go.  Every drop counts more than ever.